Ready. Fire. Aim.

Just read this post from Tom Peters in which he reminded me of something very valuable: Ready. Fire, Aim. Meaning: a bias for action. Also known as: the death of corporate planning divisions.

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But it also prompted the question in my head how that translates to software development. Then I thought about something I read from Guy Kawasaki and found it through Google:

“Ship, then test. I can feel the comments coming in already: How can you recommend shipping stuff that isn’t perfect? Blah blah blah. ”Perfect“ is the enemy of ”good enough.“ When your product or service is ”good enough,“ get it out because cash flows when you start shipping. Besides perfection doesn’t necessarily come with time–more unwanted features do. By shipping, you’ll also learn what your customers truly want you to fix. It’s definitely a tradeoff: your reputation versus cash flow, so you can’t ship pure crap. But you can’t wait for perfection either. (Nota bene: life science companies, please ignore this recommendation.”

Hallelujah.

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