The cost and difficulty of publishing

Well, almost two weeks have gone since LeWeb3 ended. And I had a great time in a beautiful city.

My highlights:

  1. Monday night dinner with all the Dutchies. Very nice to meet a bunch of passionate people from the industry IRL.
  2. Philipe Starck, Joi Ito and Marc Canter on Tuesday, as Tumblelogged here.
  3. The Wednesday brought JP Rangaswami – ‘focus on output, not input’ – and the ‘television reborn’ session with a.o. Jeff Pulver and Robert Scoble, which pointed me to a few interesting online video services I didn’t know. Doc Searls is still my hero, but his presentation was a bit rushed.

And I started using Tumblr seriously for the first time, as I wrote before I went. As you probably know, Tumblr is a tool to publish short video, audio or text based messages to your own website. Let’s start with my conclusion: I still love the tool. Tumblr has definitely entered my row of favorite web apps. It is really easy to use – you have your thought published in no-time -, it is beautifully designed, and the user interaction is very slick. Hence, I will keep publishing long-form posts at this blog and use Carp’s Moleskine for the more informal, short scribble.

tumblr.jpg

As Clay Shirky said almost four years ago (via Gapingvoid):

“So forget about blogs and bloggers and blogging and focus on this- the cost and difficulty of publishing absolutely anything, by anyone, into a global medium, just got a whole lot lower. And the effects of that increased pool of potential producers is going to be vast.”

Tumblr lowered the cost and difficulty of publishing again – big time.

UPDATE: I added an RSS feed of my latest posts at Tumblr at the right hand side of this blog to get an idea of what I’m doing over there.

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